Get ready for 

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Aimed at helping endurance athletes smash their PBs next season, this combined strength, conditioning and running session is unique. Two hour-long sessions specifically designed to be run as one. 

  • Part 1 - Strength and conditioning
  • Part 2 - Running power, endurance & technique

It's tough but succeeds in its aims like no other approach. The first part builds core strength, flexibility, agility, balance and muscle growth. It's the efficient way to achieve the things that sport-specific training doesn't do well. 

The second part is designed to build both the physical and mental toughness demanded of endurance athletes. 

The real genius of the approach is that it achieves the second objective without wasting times on junk miles.

The Beast is for Winners

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Avoiding Junk Miles

There is no question that the endurance athlete has to put in longer sessions to accustom body and mind to the extended effort. The problem is that covering miles and miles is not efficient at building the fundamental running qualities we need.

junk miles

Concentrated hill running will build muscular endurance, but it does not significantly contribute to muscular hypertrophy or force production. And the first hour of a run is not contributing to that long term endurance we re seeking; it's just getting the body into a state ready for the second phase.

The Beast is for Smart Athletes

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You want to smash your personal best

Runner abstractThe one thing most likely to stop you is injury. Not during an event but during training, a twisted ankle, Achilles tendonitis, or a pulled hamstring.

It's these injuries that stop you training that kills PBs. Not only does the body detrain faster than it trains - a two-week lay-off will probably take four weeks to retrain - but it hurts you mentally. It is so demoralising.

Normal running - or cycling -  tightens and shortens muscles making them more susceptible to damage when you twist, turn or land awkwardly. It doesn't help your balance or agility when the unexpected pothole appears. It doesn't prepare the muscles and tendons for the sudden extra force of a sprint.

Good strength and conditioning does

We can't promise an injury-free season but it will change the odds.

The Beast cares for you

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Building muscle

We know that the aim of training is to make you stronger, make your legs work better for longer. 

So how do we do that? Go running?

Certainly, that helps but you'll find it's a little more complex than that. The muscular "strength" required for running has several components; force, power and endurance and running is not particularly effective at building either force or short-term power output.

strength

The strength of a muscle depends on the size and quantity of muscle fibres and their individual strength.

The strategy for building muscle strength is straightforward:

  • Build muscle mass - hypertrophy
  • Build the strength of that muscle mass
  • Build its ability to do it repeatedly

You encourage hypertrophy by working the muscle at close to the maximum it force it can achieve - the point at which it cannot repeat it after two or three repetitions without a short break. 

You develop the power of that muscle by exercising at a level that it fails after about 6 repetitions and you build its endurance with 12 to 15 repetitions or more.

The Beast builds Strength

The Beast builds strength

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Core Strength, Flexibility, Agility, Balance

Your muscle can only work by pulling against your core which is held stable by the muscles of the chest and abdomen. As the core tires, the other muscles start to work inefficiently. 

Watch any training session on a running track and you will see the runners' posture change as the session progresses. The head starts to look down, the shoulders round and they start to bend at the waist. 

This changes their gait and affects their breathing. 

cheetah

A strong core keeps the posture right, the gait effective and the lungs open warding off fatigue. Unfortunately, running alone does little to build the core.

Add to this the fact that in a race, it is certain that at some point you will have to change direction suddenly, accelerate rapidly or simply recover your balance. When that happens it costs you extra energy and threatens a pulled muscle or strained tendon.

It's then that the flexibility to absorb the sudden change, the agility to produce the extra explosive spring and the balance to control it all makes the difference.

Simple running training just doesn't cut it.

The Beast cuts it

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Overcoming fatigue

During the second hour, you are starting to become fatigued. But what does that actually mean?

Simply put, the body is running low on energy. Actually, this is not quite true! You have enough energy stored in your body to run for several weeks without eating. It's stored as fat and even the leanest 10 stone athlete has about 30,000 calories of fat. 

It's just that the body is not very good at getting at it fast. 

During the first hour, the body is using stored glycogen and blood sugar but as the training session progresses they start to run down. This affects both muscles, brain and mood.

You need to train mind and body to cope with it, learn to absorb more fuel on the go and start using your stored fat and you simply cannot do this in a one-hour session. 

The Beast beats fatigue

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For next year's Personal Bests

When?

Every Thursday evening

7:00 - 8:00Strength  and Conditioning
8:00 - 9:00Running - Power, Endurance & Technique

Ideally, you should do both sessions back to back but if timing or fitness constrain, you are welcome to do one or other as you choose.

Where?

At the Power House, Southampton Outdoor Sports Centre. Close to the running track opposite the Ski Slope

How much?

£22.00 per month (no joining fee, no contract
£7.50 PAYG 

Or join Tri Club - up to 30 training sessions, including swim, bike, run, brick, transition and Conditioning only £29.00

Tackle the Beast

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Places are limited

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When?

Every Thursday evening

7:00 - 8:00Strength  and Conditioning
8:00 - 9:00Running - Power, Endurance & Technique

Ideally, you should do both sessions back to back but if timing or fitness constrain, you are welcome to do one or other as you choose.

Where?

At the Power House, Southampton Outdoor Sports Centre. Close to the running track opposite the Ski Slope

How much?

£22.00 per month (no joining fee, no contract
£7.50 PAYG 

Or join Tri Club - up to 30 training sessions, including swim, bike, run, brick, transition and Conditioning only £29.00